They may be safe, but there's one massive problem: There's practically no scientific data to support the idea that a CBD-infused topical cream is any more effective than other topical pain relievers, like Tiger Balm, BenGay, or Icy Hot. Michelle Sexton, a San Diego-based naturopathic doctor and medical research director of the Center for the Study of Cannabis and Social Policy says that her patients do seem to have a great interest in CBD ointments, and roughly 40 percent of them have indeed tried one. However, these people are in her office now because the topicals didn’t work for them. "As a medical professional, my opinion is there’s little evidence to back up the claims being made—it’s all marketing for now," she says.
Sagely Naturals tests its products three times: the raw cannabidiol is evaluated by extractors, then by another third party lab. Finally, when the company receives the final product, Sagely randomly selects bottles to test for the third and final time. These tests ensure that the product is devoid of GMOs, solvents, chemicals, heavy metals, pesticides, herbicides, and THC.

The increased popularity of CBD has led many users to raise questions about the methods of extracting and administering CBD. The main question is which form provides the most effective range of medical benefits for the user. The two most common forms of extracted CBD found in stores are full-spectrum (whole-plant extract) and pure CBD isolate. Most users prefer the full-spectrum option. As CBD's usefulness for medical purposes has become more accepted over the years, new methods of administering it have continued to evolve.


This peach-hued sea salt soak is the perfect Sunday afternoon bath ritual—and unlike a trendy bath bomb, it won’t turn your tub water a different color. With ingredients like magnesium flakes (stronger than Epsom salts), pink Himalayan salt, arnica, and of course, CBD extract, these crystals provide proactive therapeutic relief while also relaxing your senses with lavender and clary sage essential oils. You can also use them to soak your feet after a long run, just as you would with Epsom salts.
Stephanie, generally, I have patients take 20 to 150mg a day for sleep +/- anxiety. Start low and go slow. Know the dosages of your product. Usually 2/3 to 3/4 of the daily dose is 1-2 hours before bedtime, and the other portion is upon waking (to improve wakefulness during the day). Other factors such as stress, hormone replacement, other meds & medical conditions, etc. play a role along with individual differences. I own a compounding pharmacy, so we see a lot of unique needs. I can't give more specific advice in this forum, but there is help!
Cannabidiol is insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents such as pentane. At room temperature, it is a colorless crystalline solid.[45] In strongly basic media and the presence of air, it is oxidized to a quinone.[46] Under acidic conditions it cyclizes to THC.[47] The synthesis of cannabidiol has been accomplished by several research groups.[48][49][50]
My grandma has advanced rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis - debilitating pain and inflammation. She's on the 4th failed infusion. Nothing was working to control her pain and inflammation. I purchased the 1000mg mint CBD and the topical. I put the topical on her knees, ankles, shoulders, back, hips, and then gave her 15 1000mg drops. She instantly felt relief with the topical. She said it was a cooling pain relief. The topical smells really good.
Third-party testing: Once a CBD oil is manufactured, CBD oil companies will often submit their products for third-party tests, which are conducted by non-company personnel to ensure the product is safe for public consumption and meets quality standards.CBD oils should always be accompanied with information about third-party tests; best practice is to avoid oils that do not supply these details.

CBD Topical cream

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