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Due to its wide variety of medical benefits, CBD is used to treat a number of common conditions, including chronic pain, inflammation, seizures, insomnia, spasms, multiple sclerosis, and mental disorders such as anxiety and depression. As a topical agent, CBD oil can be directly applied to certain areas of the body as an effective means of relieving pain and soreness, reducing inflammation, and soothing inflammatory skin conditions such as psoriasis, dermatitis, and eczema.
What if you could roll up your sleeves, tie on an apron and get in the kitchen/laboratory and create your own Cannabidiol mixtures and concoctions, in a Bill Nye meets Martha Stewart sort of way? It’s easy with CBD isolate recipes that you make or modify to help you create CBD isolate edibles. The convenience and versatility of CBD isolate hemp oil lets you do that and more!
Hi Chris, the whole “product labeling” thing from brand to brand is definitely super confusing. Because the industry is so unregulated, companies can label their products “hemp oil,” “CBD oil,” “hemp extract oil,” etc, and there’s really no way to distinguish between them or tell what’s actually in them — unless they have a lab report. Basically, if you don’t see the word “CBD” anywhere on the label or on the product description, the oil is probably made from hemp seeds (in which case it has no CBD). The only sure way to know you’re getting an oil with CBD in it is to find something with a certified lab report showing the exact amount of CBD (and even still, some companies have been known to fudge their way around this). I know this isn’t the most clear-cut answer, but again, given how unregulated the industry is, there’s really no “perfect” answer. Hope this helps a little bit 🙂
I appreciate your efforts in writing this article & don’t mean to disparage you, but there’s so much information that goes into this discussion & people need to be prepared ahead of time. One very important note is to make sure that nothing in the CBD will be contraindicated with many prescription medications, especially for diabetes, hypertension, blood thinners & anti-platelets for example. If a company’s website says their formula is a “proprietary blend”, call before you buy, please!
Cannabidiol has been found to act as an antagonist of GPR55, a G protein-coupled receptor and putative cannabinoid receptor that is expressed in the caudate nucleus and putamen in the brain.[35] It has also been found to act as an inverse agonist of GPR3, GPR6, and GPR12.[12] Although currently classified as orphan receptors, these receptors are most closely related phylogenetically to the cannabinoid receptors.[12] In addition to orphan receptors, CBD has been shown to act as a serotonin 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist,[36] and this action may be involved in its antidepressant,[37][38] anxiolytic,[38][39] and neuroprotective effects.[40][41] It is an allosteric modulator of the μ- and δ-opioid receptors as well.[42] The pharmacological effects of CBD have additionally been attributed to PPARγ agonism and intracellular calcium release.[8]
Even if a topical contains active THC, it still won’t induce that intense “high” you’d get from smoking or ingesting cannabis. With most topicals, cannabinoids can’t breach the bloodstream; they only penetrate to the system of CB2 receptors. Transdermal patches, however, do deliver cannabinoids to the bloodstream and could have psychoactive effects with a high enough THC content.
As a consumer, you can look at the manufacturer's website to see whether they batch-test their products, or ask them directly. You could also send a sample of your CBD oil to a testing facility yourself, something Bonn-Miller says he would do if he were trying to treat someone with a severe issue such as epilepsy. Testing can also determine whether the product contains pesticides, heavy metals, or other toxins.
Thousands of people have learned about the healing benefits of CBD, resulting in unprecedented interest in this supplement. People are using CBD oil to ease their chronic pain, and relieve symptoms of conditions ranging from arthritis to depression. Unlike its close cousin, psychoactive cannabis (‘marijuana’), CBD oil won’t make you feel high — but many users report significant relief of their symptoms. Even the World Health Organization declared CBD oil safe and worthy of deeper research.

Along with its better-known counterpart, THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the chemical that produces the marijuana high), CBD is one of more than 400 compounds found in the oils of cannabis plant species, which include marijuana and hemp. Unlike THC, CBD will not make you high. That said, this doesn’t mean CBD is not at all psychoactive, as many assert, says Jahan Marcu, Ph.D., director of experimental pharmacology and behavior at the International Research Center on Cannabis and Mental Health in New York City: “CBD does change cognition. It affects mood, which is why people take it for anxiety. And some find that it makes them more alert.”


THC is one of the cannabinoids involved in the "entourage effect" stated earlier so it is ideal for inclusion in CBD supplementation. A recent article on full-spectrum CBD demonstrates the importance of THC inclusion by stating, "In hemp THC is a minor constituent and appears only in trace amounts under 0.3% by dry weight, as required by the U.S. government for hemp products. THC mimics the action of anandamide, a neurotransmitter naturally produced in the human body, and binds to CB1 receptors in the endocannabinoid system found mostly in the brain. The extremely low levels of THC in hemp make hemp oil non-psychoactive and safe for all ages to use."

Put simply, CBD isolate is CBD in its purest form. The process of making CBD isolate, which we’ll discuss in more detail below, separates (or isolates) the CBD from all the other stuff that makes up the marijuana plant. Hence the name CBD isolate. It’s very much akin to the almost-100-percent pure THC distillate that’s making the rounds of the canna-community.

I worked about a decade for the Colorado State Dept of Health and Environment to modernize process such as the Drinking Water Compliance system. I automated the process of over 1 M certified samples from State Certified Water Samples each MONTH. If you expect it for your water (and many other services) why wouldn’t anyone expect it for a product with “CBD” on the label?
There’s a growing body of scientific evidence to support the use of topical CBD products to ease pain, inflammation, and the symptoms of arthritis. One study using rats found that topical CBD has “therapeutic potential for relief of arthritis pain-related behaviours and inflammation without evident side-effects.” More scientific research on humans is needed to confirm all of CBD’s benefits, but the initial research into topical use in humans is also promising.
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