In the early days of cannabis culture—we’re talking the 1960s, 70s, and 80s, before CBD isolate was a gleam in some stoner chemist’s eye—you pretty much only had two ways to consume your chronic: smoke it or bake it in a brownie. We know this was a LONG time ago—heck, the word “chronic” still only had one definition (and it had nothing to do with pot), but it’s important to understand the past in order to appreciate the present.
In states that have legalized psychoactive cannabis (“marijuana”), CBD can be added directly on top of a bowl of cannabis flower or to THC containing extracts to increase the therapeutic effects. THC and CBD work together synergistically to regulate the effects of each other. For users who experience anxiety when they consume marijuana, CBD can help to soften the effects and mellow out the “high.”
Put simply, CBD isolate is CBD in its purest form. The process of making CBD isolate, which we’ll discuss in more detail below, separates (or isolates) the CBD from all the other stuff that makes up the marijuana plant. Hence the name CBD isolate. It’s very much akin to the almost-100-percent pure THC distillate that’s making the rounds of the canna-community.
I think being safe to eat is a moot point. These are topical products. I don’t think anybody is buying to eat them. It’s just a marketing tactic. In regards to the chapsticks, unless you were trying to literally eat the chapstick I think whatever negligible amount may make it past your lips and into your mouth, would certainly not be a health concern from any of these products. What concerns me more is there is zero efficacy with all of these products. Do they just decide over breakfast how much CBD needs to be added for the dosage to work? It’s ridiculous that they are marketing it as safe to eat, and people are buying into that bs and providing no clinical studies or research at all. Just my 2 cents

CBD Topical

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