Because it does not produce psychoactive effects and hemp is not a controlled substance, hemp-based products are legal to sell, buy, and possess in all 50 states. However, the law is a bit more complex when discussing CBD oils and other hemp byproducts. According to the 2014 Farm Bill, hemp should only be grown and cultivated for academic research purposes. This means that, technically, any hemp-derived oil that is not grown for these purposes would be illegal — though this law is rarely enforced. To make matters more complex, the laws are somewhat unclear in certain states. Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky recently introduced legislation that would legalize all hemp products at the federal level, but this decision is still pending.
Hi Chris, the whole “product labeling” thing from brand to brand is definitely super confusing. Because the industry is so unregulated, companies can label their products “hemp oil,” “CBD oil,” “hemp extract oil,” etc, and there’s really no way to distinguish between them or tell what’s actually in them — unless they have a lab report. Basically, if you don’t see the word “CBD” anywhere on the label or on the product description, the oil is probably made from hemp seeds (in which case it has no CBD). The only sure way to know you’re getting an oil with CBD in it is to find something with a certified lab report showing the exact amount of CBD (and even still, some companies have been known to fudge their way around this). I know this isn’t the most clear-cut answer, but again, given how unregulated the industry is, there’s really no “perfect” answer. Hope this helps a little bit 🙂
Scott Shannon, M.D., assistant clinical professor at the University of Colorado, recently sifted through patient charts from his four-doctor practice to document CBD’s effects on anxiety. His study, as yet unpublished, found “a fairly rapid decrease in anxiety scores that appears to persist for months,” he says. But he says he can’t discount a placebo effect, especially since “there’s a lot of hype right now.”
Since human skin has shown to have such a low rate of absorption for cannabinoids, the application has to be quite heavy. Think of it as a barrier that you’re pushing through. As such, CBD topicals generally direct consumers to implement a liberal application to the desired area. CBD is much more prone to penetrating through the skin in comparison to THC however, and it’s also a lot more likely to engage the CB2 cannabinoid receptors. This makes CBD a much more popular choice for creating cannabis derived CBD Topical Cream. CBD also has a lot of hemp content, making hemp a great source for CBD topicals.
Cannabidiol, or CBD for short, is a phyto-cannabinoid found in cannabis plants. However, it does not cause the same psychoactive effects as other naturally occurring cannabinoids (such as tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC). CBD induces feelings of sleepiness and tranquility, making it suitable for insomnia and other sleep disorders; CBD can be used to alleviate symptoms of epilepsy, diabetes, and anxiety disorders, as well. Legality is an issue for some; all 50 states have laws governing the sale, possession, and use of CBD, and they vary significantly (see the table below for a full analysis).
Can CBD oil help anxiety? Cannabidiol (CBD) is a chemical occurring in cannabis plants. It is possible to add CBD oil to food, and an increasing amount of evidence suggests that it may improve mental health, particularly anxiety. It does not seem to have adverse side effects, but CBD oil is illegal in some states. Learn more about CBD oil here. Read now

CBD Oil

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